2019 November Meeting

The Moore County Historical Society will meet Sunday November 10, 2019, at 2:00 PM at the Masonic Lodge in Lynchburg. 
The speaker is George Stone who will talk about the Legacy of Dr. E. Y. Salmon, who was an early settler or Moore County.  He was an early public official, physician, soldier and entrepreneur  in Moore County and his descendants were prominent in Nashville.  We will also elect officers for the coming year.

The program is open to the public and all are welcome.  Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 931-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or by phone at 931-759-7763.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 2019 November Meeting

2019 September Meeting

The Moore County Historical Society will meet Sunday September 8, 2019, at 2:00 PM at the Masonic Lodge in Lynchburg.  The speaker is Jack B. Carman who will speak on Plants used for Confederate Civil War Medicine.  During the Civil War many medicines were not available from the north and roots and herbs had to be used by the Confederates.

Jack Carman is an expert on plants especially Tennessee Wild Flowers. He published an authoritative book called WILDFLOWERS OF TENNESSEE which has excellent photography and descriptions.   Jack Carman was born in Mississippi and graduated from Mississippi State University with a degree in Aerospace engineering.  He is retired from  Arnold Engineering Development Engineering Center.  He has had a long time interest in nature photography and wildflower identification.  His photography has received numerous award and appeared on several calendars.  His articles and images have been published in the TENNESSEE CONSERVATIONIST  and TENNESSEE WILDLIFE magazines.  His knowledge of Tennessee wildflowers is recognized by both peers and  professionals .  He has served as a leader for field trips and photo workshops for the Gatlinburg Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage at th Great Smoky Mountains Park.  He also has presented wildflower programs at the Wildlife week event in Pigeon Forge.  Hie is a regular vendor at the Nashville Lawn and Garden.He is also an avid Civil War Historian and is a member of Camp 72 Benjamin F. Cheatham Sons of Confederate veterans in Manchester.

The program is open to the public and all are welcome.  Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 931-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or by phone at 931-759-7763.

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Comments Off on 2019 September Meeting

2019 June Meeting

The Moore County Historical Society will meet June 9, 2019, at 2:00 PM at the Masonic Lodge in Lynchburg.

The speaker is Doctor Michael Bradley and he will speak about Reverend David Campbell Kelley who was  a Chaplin, and officer in the Confederate Army.  One of his books concerns David Campbell Kelley, a Methodist missionary, minister, and combat officer during the war. Kelley was involved in founding many Methodist churches in the Middle Tennessee area and was one of the founders of Vanderbilt University.Dr. Bradley’s  book is entitled  Forrest’s Fighting Preacher:: David Campbell Kelley of Tennessee and this will be available at the the meeting.
Dr. Bradley is a popular speaker at many of the  local historical societies.He received his bachelor of arts degree from Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama, his bachelor of divinity degree from New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, and both his master’s degree and PhD  from Vanderbilt University. He has been a fellow with the National Endowment for the Humanities, has received a U.S. Air Force Legacy Grant for Historical Research, and was also a National Science Foundation Fellow. In 1994, he was awarded the Jefferson Davis Medal in Southern History. He is a member of the Southern Historical Association, the American Society of Church History, the American Association of University Professors, the Great Smoky Mountains Natural History Association, and the Society for Military History.Born in Huntsville, Alabama, Mr. Bradley now lives in Tullahoma, Tennessee. He taught at Motlow College from 1970 to 2006. He has written widely about local Civil War history. He has written numerous books particularly about the Civil War

The program is open to the public and all are welcome.  Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 931-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or by phone at 931-759-7763.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 2019 June Meeting

2019 March Meeting

The Moore County Historical Society will meet March 10, 2019, at 2:00 PM at the Masonic Lodge in Lynchburg. The speaker is Judy Phillips who is the archivist for Coffee and Franklin County.

The program will be on the formation of Tullahoma and General William Moore’s involvement as shown in Court Records.  Judy has been involved with the preservation of our old court records for 40 years in  Franklin, Coffee, Moore, Grundy, and Wilson County.  Judy  was born at Sewanee and  moved to Tullahoma at the age of three.  Judy  attended Tullahoma schools through the eight grade and after moving  Franklin County graduated from high school at Winchester. She is retired from the First National Bank in Tullahoma

Judy is particularly interested reaching young people to promote their history and has written three Young Adult historical novels.The story begins in Tullahoma and are the “Transporter” series. Three teenagers working on  their assignment to research a military figure are transported through the military history of Samuel Handly a Revolutionary War soldier and Indian spy who lived in Belvidere in Franklin County. The title is “Samuel Handly.” This is about the settlers arriving in Tennessee. The second novel is “Nanyehi.” , which was inspired by a Franklin County deed  This book is from the Indian point of view. The third book is a historical novel, “A Cause to Fight.” which is set in the Tullahoma, Franklin, and Moore County during the Civil War. The books are available on Amazon. The program is open to the public and all are welcome. 

Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 931-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or by phone at 931-759-7763.

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Comments Off on 2019 March Meeting

2018 November Meeting

The Moore County Historical Society will meet Sunday Nov. 11, 2018 at 2:00 PM at the Masonic Lodge in Lynchburg, Tennessee. Judy Boyd Terjen will give a presentation on the personal journal of her mother,  Mary Avon Motlow Boyd.  The Journal was titled “It Happened on Mulberry Creek” and tells of Mary Avon Boyd’s childhood years in Lynchburg.   This journal was printed for her family and there are no copies in public hands.  Mary Avon Boyd wrote about her early life in Lynchburg. It is 89 pages and flows as a historic story.   It will give a unique view on life in the early part of the 20th century in Lynchburg.

Mary Avon Motlow Boyd, 105, of Boca Raton, FL and Lexington, KY, was the widow of James C. Boyd, died Wednesday, August 23. 2017. A native of Lynchburg, TN, she was born May 10, 1912, daughter of the late Lem and Ophelia Evans Motlow. She was a graduate of Ward Belmont in Nashville, TN and Duke University.

The program is open to the public and all are welcome.  Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 931-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or 931-759-7763.

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Comments Off on 2018 November Meeting

2018 September Meeting

On Sunday September 9, at 2:00 PM at the Moore County Historical Society will meet at the  Masonic Hall in Lynchburg , The program will be presented by Christine  Pyrdom,  curator of the Moore County Archives.  Records available at the Archives are court records, tax books, some vital statistics, wills, minute cooks, church records, trust deeds and mortgages. chattel mortgages, lodge books (Lincoln Masonic Lodge which is no longer in existence], old newspapers and maps.  Also other interesting records such as dog tax records, poll tax record and business licenses.  These records date from the formation of  the Moore County in 1872 to recent history.   Prior to 1872 the  area records would be in Lincoln, Bedford and Franklin County.   Further information can be found at the Archives web site.   http://www.moorecountytnarchives.net/ . The program is open to the public and all are welcome.  Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 921-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or 931-759-7763.

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Tagged | Comments Off on 2018 September Meeting

2018 June Meeting

Sunday, June 10, at 2:00 PM at the Moore County Historical Society will meet at the  Masonic Hall in Lynchburg, The program will be presented by John N. Lovett, Jr., Ph.D.  It will be on Pre-Civil war cotton and spinning mills in the Moore and Franklin County area. There were many mills located int the area.  There were several on Mulberrry Creek.

John Lovett is a native of Crossett, Arkansas, and has lived in Tennessee since 1976. He and his wife Janie purchased Falls Mill near Belvidere in 1984 as a site for the development of their Museum of Power and Industry. They moved from Chattanooga where John had been an Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. He taught from 1984 until 1991 at the University of Alabama in Huntsville before going into engineering consulting part-time. In 2006 John “retired” from engineering to devote his time to working at Falls Mill and on other mill restoration projects. John and Janie have been members of The Society for the Preservation of Old Mills (SPOOM) for more than 35 years. John has served on the SPOOM Board of Directors for many years and has done extensive restoration work on Falls Mill. He has also consulted on more than 80 mill restoration or construction projects across the country. Projects have included mill design and equipment layout, waterwheel and turbine installation, machinery restoration, and millstone sharpening. He is currently focusing on restoring a rare collection of nineteenth century textile equipment for interpretive exhibit at Falls Mill. John became an instructor when he helped organize the SPOOM Miller Training program in 2008. He was involved in developing the curriculum and has conducted, with other instructors, numerous sessions to date. He and Janie have also hosted several “hands-on” Miller Training sessions at Falls Mill.

The program is open to the public and all are welcome.  Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 921-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or 931-759-7763.

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Tagged | Comments Off on 2018 June Meeting

2018 March Meeting

On Sunday, March 11, at 2:00 PM at the Moore County Historical Society will meet at the Masonic Hall in Lynchburg , Al Simmons will present a program called “Mt Herman Community, tis settlers, families and cemeteries, the center of the Chestnut Ridge” Mt. Herman is located at the intersection of Moore, Lincoln and Bedford counties and is on the Chestnut Ridge which intersects the counties. It was one of the earliest settled areas in these counties and was important in the development of these counties. Our speaker Al Simmons is retired from Arnold Engineering Development Center. He is president of the Bedford County Historical Society and the Chestnut Ridge Cousins. He is a native of Bedford County and has been a historical researcher for many years. The program is open to the public and all are welcome. Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 921-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or 931-759-7763.

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Comments Off on 2018 March Meeting

2017 November Meeting

On Sunday, November 12, at 2:00 PM at the Moore County Historical Society in Masonic Hall in Lynchburg, Richard Dix will present a program called “America’s forgotten veteran, the horse”. The horse and other equines have been used in all American wars and have died by the millions. Some were very famous but most died unknown. The were indispensable serving the military. The program is open to the public and all are welcome. For further information Contact George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or by phone at 921-581-2621 or Betty Robertson at grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or 931-759-7763.

During the Civil (1861–1865), cavalry held the most important and respected role it would ever hold in the American military was also highly mobile. Both horses and mules pulled the guns, though only horses were used on the battlefield. At the beginning of the war, most of the experienced cavalry officers were from the South and thus joined the Confederacy, leading to the Confederate Army’s initial battlefield superiority. The tide turned at the 1863 Battle of Brandy Station, part of where the Union Cavalry in the largest cavalry battle ever fought on the American continent ended the dominance of the South By 1865, Union cavalry were decisive in achieving victory ] So important were horses that the surrender terms at Appomattox allowed every Confederate cavalryman to take his horse home with him. This was because, unlike their Union counterparts, Confederate cavalrymen provided their own horses for service instead of drawing them from the government.

In World War 1 On both fronts, the horse was also used as pack animal. Because railway lines could not withstand artillery bombardments, horses carried ammunition and supplies between the rail heads and the rear trenches, though the horses generally were not used in the actual trench zone This role of horses was critical, and thus horse fodder was the single largest commodity shipped to the front by some countries.

In WWII , horses and mules were an essential form of transport, especially by the British in the rough terrain of Italy and the Middle East The German and the Soviet armies used horses until the end of the war for transportation of troops and supplies. The German Army, strapped for motorized transport because its factories were needed to produce tanks and aircraft, used around 2.75 million horses—more than it had used in World War I.[ One German infantry division in Normandy in 1944 had 5,000 horse ] The Soviets used 3.5 million horses.

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Comments Off on 2017 November Meeting

2017 September Meeting

Charmaine Riley Holley will be presenting a program entitled “Introduction to DNA and Developing a DNA Testing Plan for Your Genealogy.” at the Moore County Historical Society meeting September 10, 2017 at 2:00 PM in Lynchburg at the Masonic Lodge. Charmaine has conducted genealogical research for more than thirty years and added DNA as a research tool in 2013. She attended the first offered week-long Genetic Genealogy workshop in 2013 in Pittsburg and several advanced workshops since that time. She also completed the 15 week Genetic Genealogy course at Excelsior College taught last fall by Blaine Bettinger, JD, PhD (Biochemistry). She has many Tennessee roots (some going back to before 1820), including Anderson, Hill, Uselton, Moore, and others in Bedford, Coffee, and Franklin Counties.

For further information contact Betty Robertson at 931-759-7763, email grannyjorobertson@gmail.com or George Stone at georgestone@cafes.net or at
931-581-2621

Posted in Historical & Genealogical Society | Comments Off on 2017 September Meeting